Wednesday, 25 December 2013

Speakout Advanced p 86. Keys and Vocabulary

Ex 2A
KEY
1 She let him travel home on the subway in New York alone when he was nine years old. 



2 Because he had been nagging her for weeks to be allowed out on his own and because she believes in encouraging independence.
 



3 She received support from some, and a lot of negative reactions from others. She was accused of being 'crazy' and 'America's worst mom'. 



4 She thinks that if you are too over-protective then your children do not learn about danger and about how to take risks, which then becomes a danger in itself. 

Vocabulary
deliberately: /dɪˈlɪbərətli/ done in a way that was planned, not by chance. E.g. She's been deliberately ignoring him all day.

unleashed a media frenzy (started an exaggerated response)
unleash something (on/upon somebody/something): /ʌnˈliːʃ/  to suddenly let a strong force, emotion, etc. be felt or have an effect. Sp. desatar. E.g. The government's proposals unleashed a storm of protest in the press.

frenzy: /ˈfrenzi/ a state of great activity and strong emotion that is often violent or frightening and not under control. Sp. frenesí, histerismo. E.g. in a frenzy of activity/ excitement/ violence. The speaker worked the crowd up into a frenzy. An outbreak of patriotic frenzy. A killing frenzy.

ecstatic: /ɪkˈstætɪk/ very happy, excited and enthusiastic; feeling or showing great enthusiasm. E.g. Sally was ecstatic about her new job. Martin was not exactly ecstatic at the news.

nag: ask over and over again. To keep complaining to somebody about their behaviour or keep asking them to do something. Pester. E.g. She had been nagging him to paint the fence. She nagged him to do the housework. He’s always nagging at her for staying out late. She constantly nags her daughter about getting married.

unsupervised: not done or acting under supervision. E.g. unsupervised visitsA safe garden where children may play unsupervised.

quarter: a coin of the US and Canada worth 25 cents.

land in something | land somebody/yourself in something (informal) to get somebody/ yourself into a difficult situation. E.g. She was arrested and landed in court. His hot temper has landed him in trouble before. Now you've really landed me in it! (= got me into trouble). Dean's really landed me in it by saying that I didn't mind helping. Her actions landed her in a huge row. 

row: /raʊ/ A serious dispute. Quarrel. E.g. the director is at the centre of a row over policy decisions. They had a row and she stormed out of the house.

come out: to say publicly whether you agree or disagree with something. E.g. come out in favour of/ against (doing) something. He came out against the plan. In her speech, the senator came out in favour of a change in the law. Many came out to support her. The commission has come out against the takeover. 
To say something in an open, honest, or public way that often makes someone feel surprised, embarrassed, or offended come (right) out and say something:  e.g. We were all thinking he'd made a mistake, but nobody would come out and say it.

Mount Fuji located on Honshu Island, is the highest mountain in Japan at 3,776.24 m.

 
flip-flop: a type of sandal (= open shoe) that has a piece of leather, etc. that goes between the big toe and the toe next to it. E.g. a pair of flip-flops.

 
subsequently/ˈsʌbsɪkwəntli/ afterwards; later; after something else has happened. E.g. The original interview notes were subsequently lost. Subsequently, new guidelines were issued to all employees. He subsequently became chairman of the party.

A security detail more often known as a PSD, standing for Protective Services Detail, Personal Security Detachment, or Personal Security Detail is a protective team assigned to protect the personal security of an individual or group. PSDs can be made up of military personnel, private security contractors, or law enforcement agents.


Free-range: connected with a system of farming in which animals are kept in natural conditions and can move around freely. E.g. free-range chickens. Free-range eggs.

advocate: /ˈædvəkeɪt/ to support something publicly. E.g. advocate something The group does not advocate the use of violence. Advocate (somebody) doing something Many experts advocate rewarding your child for good behaviour.

outlook (on something) the attitude to life and the world of a particular person, group or culture. E.g. He had a practical outlook on life. Most Western societies are liberal in outlook.

protectiveness /prəˈtektɪvnəs/

risk-averse: not willing to do something if it is possible that something bad could happen as a result. E.g. We live in a risk-averse culture. In business you cannot be innovative and risk-averse at the same time.

averse /əˈvɜːs/ to something / to doing something (formal) not liking something or wanting to do something; opposed to doing something. E.g. He was averse to any change. 
 
stifle something to prevent something from happening; to prevent a feeling from being expressed. Suppress. E.g. They hope the new rules will not stifle creativity. The government failed to stifle the unrest.

mollycoddle somebody /ˈmɒlikɒdl/ to protect somebody too much and make their life too comfortable and safe. E.g. She was mollycoddled as a child.

Ex 2B
KEY

1 independence 



2 mollycoddle 



3 deliberately,
 



expose 



4 reasonable risks, 



unsupervised 



5 over-protective



6 risk-averse 

Ex 3
KEY
 
1W 



2M 



3W  
stand (on something) an attitude towards something or an opinion that you make clear to people. E.g. to take a firm stand on something. He was criticized for his tough stand on immigration.

mollycoddle somebody /ˈmɒlikɒdl/ to protect somebody too much and make their life too comfortable and safe. E.g. She was mollycoddled as a child.



4W
streetwise: /ˈstriːtwaɪz/ having the knowledge and experience that is needed to deal with the difficulties and dangers of life in a big city. E.g. Kids seem much more streetwise these days.



5W
be thrown in at the deep end (also jump in at the deep end) (informal) to start or be made to start a new and difficult activity that you are not prepared for. E.g. Junior hospital doctors are thrown in at the deep end in their first jobs.



6M 



7M 



8M
push: to persuade or encourage somebody to do something that they may not want to do. E.g. push somebody (into something/ into doing something) My teacher pushed me into entering the competition. Push somebody to do something No one pushed you to take the job, did they?

Ex 4A
KEY
a) joking 



b) right 



c) point 



d) think 



e) judgement
judgement (of/about/on something) an opinion that you form about something after thinking about it carefully; the act of making this opinion known to others. E.g. Against my better judgement, I gave him the job. I lent him the money against my better judgement. I did it against my better judgement(= although I thought it was perhaps the wrong thing to do. If you do something against your better judgement, you do it although you think it is wrong. Not the best decision you believe you could make)



f) say 



g) sense 



h) ridiculous 

Transcript
Vocabulary

mug somebody to attack somebody violently in order to steal their money, especially in a public place. E.g. She had been mugged in the street in broad daylight.

stand (on something) an attitude towards something or an opinion that you make clear to people. E.g. to take a firm stand on something. He was criticized for his tough stand on immigration.
take a stand (against someone or something) to take a position in opposition to someone or something; to oppose or resist someone or something. E.g. The treasurer was forced to take a stand against the board because of its wasteful spending. The treasurer took a stand, and others agreed.
 
mollycoddle somebody /ˈmɒlikɒdl/ to protect somebody too much and make their life too comfortable and safe. E.g. She was mollycoddled as a child.

cotton wool: 1. a soft mass of white material that is used for cleaning the skin or a wound. E.g. cotton wool balls. 2. a state of pampered comfort and protection. E.g. Don't wrap them in cotton wool as they grow up. Cotton-wool kids (also bubble-wrapped kids).





streetwise: /ˈstriːtwaɪz/ having the knowledge and experience that is needed to deal with the difficulties and dangers of life in a big city. E.g. Kids seem much more streetwise these days.

judgement (of/about/on something) an opinion that you form about something after thinking about it carefully; the act of making this opinion known to others. E.g. Against my better judgement, I gave him the job. I lent him the money against my better judgement. I did it against my better judgement(= although I thought it was perhaps the wrong thing to do. If you do something against your better judgement, you do it although you think it is wrong. Not the best decision you believe you could make) 

Chuck: to throw something carelessly or without much thought. E.g. chuck something (+ adverb/ preposition) He chucked the paper in a drawer. Chuck somebody something Chuck me the newspaper, would you?
be thrown in at the deep end (also jump in at the deep end) (informal) to start or be made to start a new and difficult activity that you are not prepared for. E.g. Junior hospital doctors are thrown in at the deep end in their first jobs.

mugging: the crime of attacking somebody violently, or threatening to do so, in order to steal their money, especially in a public place. E.g. Mugging is on the increase. There have been several muggings here recently.

rate: a measurement of the number of times something happens or exists during a particular period. Sp. tasa, índice. E.g. Local businesses are closing at a/ the rate of three a year. A high/ low/ rising rate of unemployment. The annual crime/ divorce rate. His pulse rate dropped suddenly. A high success/ failure rate.

horrendous /hɒˈrendəs/



not have a clue (informal)1 to know nothing about something or about how to do something. E.g. I don't have a clue where she lives. 2 (disapproving) to be very stupid. E.g. Don't ask him to do it—he doesn't have a clue!




take something with a pinch of salt to be careful about believing that something is completely true. E.g. If I were you, I'd take everything he says with a pinch of salt. 

go on (usually be going on) to happen. What's going on here? He has got a lot going on. 

empower somebody (to do something) to give somebody more control over their own life or the situation they are in. E.g. The movement actively empowered women and gave them confidence in themselves.
empowerment: e.g. the empowerment of the individual.

push: to persuade or encourage somebody to do something that they may not want to do. E.g. push somebody (into something/ into doing something) My teacher pushed me into entering the competition. Push somebody to do something No one pushed you to take the job, did they?
 
stand up for somebody/ something: to support or defend somebody/ something. E.g. Always stand up for your friends. You must stand up for your rights. She had learnt to stand up for herself.

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