Saturday, 14 December 2013

Speakout Advanced p 75. Don’t Buy What You Don’t Need . Extra Word Formation

Consumerism is not a pathway to joy and meaning in life. If specifically asked the question, nobody would ever say the secret to a 1-________________ (JOY), meaningful life is to buy a lot of stuff. Deep down in our hearts, we know we were made for something bigger, something more significant than mere 2- ________________ (CONSUME). However, we work more hours than ever before, earn more 3-________________ (COME), but save less. Personal debt has increased 4-________________ (DRAMA) over the previous three decades. And consumer spending has been exalted to a virtue in our society.

As a result, the average credit card holder now carries four different credit cards in his or her pocket. Shopping malls 5-________________ (NUMBER) high schools two to one. Seventy per cent of Americans visit a shopping mall each week. Home sizes have doubled in the past fifty years. And consumer debt has risen to 35% of 6-________________ (HOUSE) income.

Will Rogers said it like this, “Too many people spend money they haven’t earned, to buy things they don’t want, to impress people they don’t like.”

We never intentionally set out to buy more than we need or spend more than we make. But here’s the problem: 7-________________ (MINDFUL) consumption always turns into excessive consumption. And excess consumption results in more stress, more burden, more pressure to impress, more 8-________________ (ENVIOUS), less financial freedom, less generosity, less contentment—and I haven’t even begun to mention the environmental impact.

It is time to rethink our spending habits, rediscover thoughtfulness and intentionality in our purchases, and remind ourselves that happiness is not on 9-________________ (SELL) at the department store. Buying more is not the solution. We were made for greater 10-________________ (PURSUE) than material possessions. And our lives should reflect that truth.


















KEY
Consumerism is not a pathway to joy and meaning in life. If specifically asked the question, nobody would ever say the secret to a joyful, meaningful life is to buy a lot of stuff. Deep down in our hearts, we know we were made for something bigger—something more significant than mere consumption. However, we work more hours than ever before, earn more income, but save less. Personal debt has increased dramatically over the previous three decades. And consumer spending has been exalted to a virtue in our society.

As a result, the average credit card holder now carries 4 different credit cards in his or her pocket. Shopping malls outnumber high schools 2 to 1. 70% of Americans visit a shopping mall each week. Home sizes have doubled in the past 50 years. And consumer debt has risen to 35% of household income.

Will Rogers said it like this, “Too many people spend money they haven’t earned, to buy things they don’t want, to impress people they don’t like.”

We never intentionally set out to buy more than we need or spend more than we make. But here’s the problem: mindless consumption always turns into excessive consumption. And excess consumption results in more stress, more burden, more pressure to impress, more envy, less financial freedom, less generosity, less contentment—and I haven’t even begun to mention the environmental impact.

It is time to rethink our spending habits, rediscover thoughtfulness and intentionality in our purchases, and remind ourselves that happiness is not on sale at the department store. Buying more is not the solution. We were made for greater pursuits than material possessions. And our lives should reflect that truth.

Adapted from
http://www.becomingminimalist.com/less-consumerism/

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