Monday, 25 November 2013

Speakout Advanced p 56. Keys and Vocabulary

Ex 1
innermost: /ˈɪnəməʊst/ most private, personal and secret. E.g. I could not express my innermost feelings to anyone. The book reveals his innermost secrets. Who would you talk to if you wanted to tell someone your innermost thoughts?


 
 
Ex 2A
KEY
It means that people are more open, that they are more likely to talk about their experiences, both good and bad.

Vocabulary
confessional: (of speech or writing) in which a person reveals private thoughts or admits to past incidents, especially ones about which they feel ashamed or embarrassed.E.g. the autobiography is remarkably confessional.

allegedly: /əˈledʒɪdli/ used to convey that something is claimed to be the case or have taken place, although there is no proof. Sp. presuntamente, supuestamente. E.g. he was allegedly a leading participant in the coup attempt. Crimes allegedly committed during the war.

willing (to do something) not objecting to doing something; having no reason for not doing something. E.g. They keep a list of people (who are) willing to work nights. I'm perfectly willing to discuss the problem. Would you be willing to help me with my essay? Unemployment can be defined as the number of people who are willing and able to work, but who cannot find jobs.

divulge something (to somebody)| divulge what, whether, etc… (formal) /daɪˈvʌldʒ/ to give somebody information that is supposed to be secret. Reveal. E.g. Police refused to divulge the identity of the suspect. When is it appropriate to divulge a secret and how should it be done?

take something up with somebody: to speak or write to somebody about something that they may be able to deal with or help you with. E.g. They decided to take the matter up with their MP.

Ex 2B
KEY
4 secrets: how much her father earned, that a girl was going out with another girl’s boyfriend, accidentally telling someone what their Christmas present was, a romance with another man.

slap: hit someone with the flat part of your hand. 

make up: become friends again after an argument.

Ex 2C
KEY
1 His daughter telling people how much money he earned 



2 Yes, she was. 



3 What her husband had bought her as a Christmas present 



4 Yes, she is. 



5 Secrets that protect somebody or something in a way that wouldn’t damage them when they ultimately find out.

Vocabulary 
keep (yourself) to yourself to avoid meeting people socially or becoming involved in their affairs. E.g. Nobody knows much about him; he keeps himself very much to himself.

knowledgeable (about something) /ˈnɒlɪdʒəbl/ knowing a lot. Well informed. E.g. She is very knowledgeable about plants.

behind closed doors: without the public being allowed to attend or know what is happening; in private. E.g. The meeting was held behind closed doors.

hang out: (of washing) hang from a clothes line to dry. E.g. the inhabitants fled with such haste that their washing is still hanging out.

fall out: to become loose and drop. E.g. His hair is falling out. My tooth fell out. 

slap somebody/something (+ adverb/preposition) to hit somebody/something with the flat part of your hand. Smack. E.g. She slapped his face hard. She slapped him hard across the face. ‘Congratulations!’ he said, slapping me on the back. 

make up (with somebody)  to end a disagreement with somebody and become friends again. E.g. Why don't you two kiss and make up? Has he made it up with her yet? Have they made it up yet?




let slip something: to give somebody information that is supposed to be secret. E.g. I happened to let it slip that he had given me £1000 for the car. She tried not to let slip what she knew.

give something/somebody away: to make known something that somebody wants to keep secret. E.g. She gave away state secrets to the enemy. It was supposed to be a surprise but the children gave the game away. His voice gave him away (= showed who he really was). 

spill the beans: (informal) to tell somebody something that should be kept secret or private. E.g. In addition to telling us the good, the not-so-good and the surprising news about your relationship with food, you also spilled the beans on your deepest, darkest dieting secrets. Little children will usually spill the beans without meaning to.

keep/stay shtum (also schtum) /ʃtʊm/ to not speak. Police have appealed for witnesses, but it seems the locals are keeping shtum.



at the drop of a hat: immediately; without hesitating. E.g. The company can't expect me to move my home and family at the drop of a hat.

get across (to somebody)/ get something across (to somebody) to be communicated or understood; to succeed in communicating something. E.g. Your meaning didn't really get across. He's not very good at getting his ideas across. The point of my book was to get across the fact that...

outcome: /ˈaʊtkʌm/ the result or effect of an action or event. E.g. We are waiting to hear the final outcome of the negotiations. These costs are payable whatever the outcome of the case. We are confident of a successful outcome. Four possible outcomes have been identified.

ultimatelyfinally; in the end. E.g. the largest firms may ultimately become unstoppable.

frown on/upon somebody/something: /fraʊn/ to disapprove of somebody/ something. E.g. In her family, any expression of feeling was frowned upon.

Ex 3A
KEY
1 themselves 
keep (yourself) to yourself to avoid meeting people socially or becoming involved in their affairs. Keep your affairs private. E.g. Nobody knows much about him; he keeps himself very much to himself.



2 doors  
behind closed doors: without the public being allowed to attend or know what is happening; in private. Confidentially. E.g. The meeting was held behind closed doors.



3 let 
let slip something: to give somebody information that is supposed to be secret. Reveal. E.g. I happened to let it slip that he had given me £1000 for the car. She tried not to let slip what she knew.


4 beans 
spill the beans: (informal) to tell somebody something that should be kept secret or private. Divulge a secret. E.g. In addition to telling us the good, the not-so-good and the surprising news about your relationship with food, you also spilled the beans on your deepest, darkest dieting secrets. Little children will usually spill the beans without meaning to.



5 stay
keep/stay shtum (also schtum) /ʃtʊm/ to not speak.Keep quiet. Keep information confidential. E.g.  Police have appealed for witnesses, but it seems the locals are keeping shtum.



6 cat  
let the cat out of the bag: to tell a secret carelessly or by mistake. Reveal. E.g. I wanted it to be a surprise, but my sister let the cat out of the bag.


7 game 
give something/somebody away: to make known something that somebody wants to keep secret. Reveal. E.g. She gave away state secrets to the enemy. It was supposed to be a surprise but the children gave the game away. His voice gave him away (= showed who he really was).

Ex 3B
KEY
1 e) 



2 b) 



3 c) 



4 a) 



5 d) 



6 c) 



7 c)


p 152
Ex 1A
KEY
1 c)
classified: officially secret and available only to particular people. Confidential. E.g. classified information/ documents/ material. 



2 d) 
divulge something (to somebody)| divulge what, whether, etc… (formal) /daɪˈvʌldʒ/ to give somebody information that is supposed to be secret. Reveal. E.g. Police refused to divulge the identity of the suspect. When is it appropriate to divulge a secret and how should it be done?

blurt something (out)| blurt that…| blurt what, how, etc… to say something suddenly and without thinking carefully enough. E.g. She blurted it out before I could stop her. ‘She's pregnant,’ Jack blurted.




3 b) 
between you and me  (also between you, me and the bedpost/gatepost) something that you say when you are going to tell someone something you do not want them to tell anyone else. E.g. Just between you and me, I don't think his work is quite up to standard. Between you, me and the gatepost, I'm thinking of leaving.

hush-hush: (adj) /hʌʃ hʌʃ/ secret and not known about by many people. E.g. Their wedding was very hush-hush.
 



4 e) 
covert: /ˈkʌvət/ /ˈkəʊvɜːt/ secret or hidden, making it difficult to notice. E.g. covert operations/ surveillance. He stole a covert glance at her across the table. Every measure, both overt and covert, is being taken against terrorists.

overt: /əʊˈvɜːt/ done in an open way and not secretly. E.g. There was little overt support for the project.

top secret: that must be kept completely secret, especially from other governments. E.g. This information has been classified top secret. Top-secret documents.



5 a)
hide something to keep something secret, especially your feelings. Conceal. E.g. She struggled to hide her disappointment. I have never tried to hide the truth about my past. They claim that they have nothing to hide (= there was nothing wrong or illegal about what they did). She's behaving as if she has something to hide.

furtive: /ˈfɜːtɪv/ behaving in a way that shows that you want to keep something secret and do not want to be noticed. Stealthy. She cast a furtive glance over her shoulder. He looked sly and furtive.

surreptitious: /ˌsʌrəpˈtɪʃəs/ done secretly or quickly, in the hope that other people will not notice. E.g. She sneaked a surreptitious glance at her watch.

sneak:  to do something or take somebody/something somewhere secretly, often without permission. E.g. We sneaked a look at her diary. I managed to sneak a note to him. I managed to sneak him a note.

glance: /ɡlɑːns/ a quick look. E.g. to take/have a glance at the newspaper headlines

stealthy: /ˈstelθi/ doing things quietly or secretly; done quietly or secretly. E.g. a stealthy animal. A stealthy movement. Stealthy footsteps.

sly: /slaɪ/ 1. acting or done in a secret or dishonest way, often intending to trick people. Cunning. E.g. a sly political move. A sly, manipulative woman. 2. suggesting that you know something secret that other people do not know. E.g. a sly smile/ grin/ look/ glance, etc.

Cunning: /ˈkʌnɪŋ/ able to get what you want in a clever way, especially by tricking or cheating somebody. E.g. a cunning liar. He was as cunning as a fox.

Ex 1B
KEY

1 C 



2 B 



3 E 



4 D
 



5 A 

Ex 1C 
KEY

1, 2, 4, b), e)


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