Thursday, 21 November 2013

Speakout Advanced p 52. Blackadder. Listening

When this is over they want to have (1)___________ lunch.
The court is now in (2)___________.
General Sir Anthony Cecil Hogmanay Melchett in the (3)________.
The case before us is that of the (4)______________ Captain Edmund Blackadder
The (5)_________ before us is that the Flanders pigeon murderer did deliberately, (6)___________ and with (7)______________________ murder a carrier pigeon.
The (8)_________ for the defence gets (9)___________ it and calls his first witness, Captain Darling, who claims that Captain Blackadder ignores orders. However the lawyer was (10)__________ on him saying he didn't.
Captain Blackadder ironically says that George had Captain Darling on (11)____________  there.
George's decisive witness is (12)___________ Baldrick who denies being Captain Blackadder's (13)___________
George firmly believes that Captain Blackadder is in fact totally and (14)___________ guilty! ... Of nothing more than trying to do his duty under difficult (15)_____________.
General Melchett disagrees and says that he is a (16)__________ and a (17)___________
Captain Darling asks General Melchett if he owned a lovely (18)___________ pigeon called Speckled Jim, which he (19)______________ from a chick.
Captain Darling asks if Captain Blackadder shot the (20)_______________ pigeon
General Melchett has absolutely no (21)_____________ announcing that Captain Blackadder is sentenced to death by shooting the following day (22)_____________.
Captain Blackadder asks if he could have an (23)____________.

KEY
1. a spot of
spot of something (British English, informal) a small amount of something. Bit. E.g. He's in a spot of trouble. Would you like a spot of lunch? She's gone out to do a spot of shopping. 



2. session



3. chair



4. crown versus



5. charge (official accusation. Sp. cargo)





6. callously
callously /ˈkæləsli/ not caring about other people's feelings or suffering. Cruelly. Unfeelingly. E.g. If I had known that you loved me, I should never have behaved so callously.



7. beastliness of forethought
beastliness: behaviour typical of a beast.
forethought: thinking or planning out in advance :  premeditation. E.g. Her decision showed a lack of forethought. With a little forethought, you can save yourself a lot of work later on.
with malice aforethought (law) with the deliberate intention of committing a crime or harming somebody. E.g. the accused has caused death but did not have malice aforethought.


carrier pigeon: a pigeon that has been trained to carry messages. 






8. counsel
counsel: a lawyer or group of lawyers representing somebody in court. E.g. to be represented by counsel. The counsel for the defence/ prosecution.



9. on with



get on with something: to continue doing something, especially after an interruption. E.g. Be quiet and get on with your work. (Informal) Get on with it! We haven't got all day.


10. banking
bank on somebody/something: to rely on somebody/ something. I'm banking on your help. ‘I'm sure he'll help.’ ‘ Don't bank on it (= it is not likely to happen).’  Bank on somebody/ something to do something I'm banking on you to help me. Bank on somebody/ something doing something I was banking on getting something to eat on the train.



11. the ropes
on the ropes: (informal) very close to being defeated. E.g. I had him on the ropes.



12. Private
private: /ˈpraɪvət/ a soldier of the lowest rank in the army. Sp. soldado raso. E.g. Private (John) Smith.



13. batman 
batman: the personal servant of an officer in the armed forces.



14. utterly



15. circumstances



16. hound
hound
1. a dog that can run fast and has a good sense of smell, used for hunting. E.g. The hounds picked up the scent of the fox.
2. a despicable or contemptible man.
contemptible: not deserving any respect at all 






17. rotter

rotter: a person who behaves badly towards other people. Sp. canalla.



18. plump speckly
plump: having a soft, round body; slightly fat. E.g. a short, plump woman. A plump face

speckly: covered or marked with small spots or patches of colour. Sp. con motitas/manchitas. E.g. the eggs are large and brown and speckly.



19. hand-reared
hand-rear: (of a person) feed and care for (a young animal) until it is fully grown. E.g. the baby gorillas were hand-reared by zookeepers after being rejected by their mothers.



20.  aforementioned

aforementioned: (also aforesaid) mentioned before, in an earlier sentence. E.g. The aforementioned person was seen acting suspiciously. Insurance is included on all aforesaid items. 
 
 
 
21. hesitation in
 
 
 
22. at dawn
 
 
 
23. alarm call 
alarm call: a telephone call which is intended to wake you up. E.g. Could I have an alarm call at 5.30 tomorrow, please?


Transcript

GM=General Melchett CB=Captain Blackadder
G=George CD=Captain Darling PB=Private Baldrick
GM: Come on then, come on. Get this over in five minutes and we can have a spot of lunch. Right ooh, ah, the court is now in session. General Sir Anthony Cecil Hogmanay Melchett in the chair. The case before us is that of the crown versus Captain Edmund Blackadder, the Flanders pigeon murderer.
CB: I love a fair trial.
GM: Right, let the trial begin. The charge before us is that the Flanders pigeon murderer did deliberately, callously and with beastliness of forethought murder a lovely, innocent pigeon, and disobeyed some orders as well. Is this true?
G: Perfectly true sir I was there.
CB: Thanks, George.
G: Damn, damn.
GM: Right, counsel for the defence, get on with it.
G: Oh right yes, yes right um, yes. I'd like to call my first witness, Captain Darling.
GM: You wish to call the counsel for the prosecution as a defence witness?
G: That's right. Don't worry sir I've got it all under control. You are Captain Darling of the General Staff?
CD: I am.
G: Captain, leaving aside the incident in question, would you think of Captain Blackadder as the sort of man who would usually ignore orders?
CD: Yes, I would.
G: Ah! Um, are you sure? I, I was rather banking on you saying no there.
CD: I'm sure. In fact I have a list of other orders he's disobeyed if it would be useful.
GM:Mmhmm.
CB: George!!
G: Oh yeah right yes. Yes, thank you Captain, no further questions.
CB: Well done George! You really had him on the ropes there.
G: Don't worry old man. I have a last and I think you'll find decisive witness. Call Private Baldrick!
CB: Deny everything, Baldrick.
G: Are you Private Baldrick?
PB: No!
G: Oh um, but you are Captain Blackadder's batman?
PB: No!
G: Come on Baldrick! Be a bit more helpful - it's me.
PB: No, it isn't.
CD: Sir, I must protest.
GM: Quite right, we don't need your kind here Private. Get out! Now George, sum up please.
G: Right yes, er ... right. Ah gentlemen, you have heard all the evidence presented before you today, but in the end it is up to the conscience of your hearts to decide. And I firmly believe that like me, you will conclude that Captain Blackadder is in fact totally and utterly guilty! ... Of nothing more than trying to do his duty under difficult circumstances.
GM: Nonsense he's a hound and a rotter and he's gonna be shot. However, before we proceed to the formality of sentencing the deceased, uh I mean the defendant, I think we'd all rather enjoy hearing the case for the prosecution, Captain Darling if you please.
CD: Uh, my case is very simple. I call my first witness, General Sir Anthony Cecil Hogmanay Melchett.
GM:Ah um.
G: Clever, clever.
CD: General, did you own a lovely plump speckly pigeon called Speckled Jim, which you hand-reared from a chick and which was your only childhood friend?
GM: Yes! Yes I did.
CD: And did Captain Blackadder shoot the aforementioned pigeon?
GM: Yes, he did.
CD: Can you see Captain Blackadder anywhere in this courtroom?!
GM: It's him! That's him' That's the man. There!!
CD: No more questions sir.
GM: Splendid, excellent, first class! Out the way, come on. I therefore have absolutely no hesitation in announcing that the sentence of this court is that you Captain Edmund Blackadder be taken from this place and suffer death by shooting tomorrow at dawn. Do you have anything to say?
CB: Yes, could I have an alarm call please?

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