Tuesday, 19 November 2013

Speakout Advanced p 50. Keys and Vocabulary

Warm up
Have you ever witnessed a crime?
What happened?
What would you do if you saw someone being robbed in the street?
Would you do anything if you knew someone hadn’t declared a major source of income on their tax form?
Have you ever committed a ‘small’ crime e.g. driving too fast, kept something you’ve found, etc.?

Ex 1A
dilemma: /dɪˈlemə/ /daɪˈlemə/ a situation which makes problems, often one in which you have to make a very difficult choice between things of equal importance. E.g. to face a dilemma. To be in a dilemma. You are faced with a dilemma.
think something through: to consider a problem or a possible course of action fully. E.g. Have you had time to think things through?
weigh (up) to consider something carefully before making a decision. E.g. weigh something (up) You must weigh up the pros and cons (= consider the advantages and disadvantages of something). She weighed up all the evidence.

Ex 1B
KEY

1 faced with a dilemma 
dilemma: /dɪˈlemə/ /daɪˈlemə/ a situation which makes problems, often one in which you have to make a very difficult choice between things of equal importance. E.g. to face a dilemma. To be in a dilemma. You are faced with a dilemma.



2 thinking it through
think something through: to consider a problem or a possible course of action fully. E.g. Have you had time to think things through?



3 take all these things into consideration 



4 weighed up the pros and cons
weigh (up) to consider something carefully before making a decision. E.g. weigh something (up) You must weigh up the pros and cons (= consider the advantages and disadvantages of something). She weighed up all the evidence.

Ex 1C
Examples of dilemmas
How to best help learners remember new vocabulary.
Whether they should put money into a company which they know has a poor ethical record.
Whether to allow their child to go on holiday with his/ her friends.
Whether to experiment on animals.
Whether to participate in a war which they know is morally wrong.
How to help someone they know is addicted to drugs.

Ex 3

KEY
1 Ann Timson had to decide whether to stop the burglars or not.

Vocabulary 
gran: grandmother. E.g. Do you want to go to your gran's? Gran, can I have some more? My gran lives with us.

bash to hit somebody/something very hard. E.g. He bashed her over the head with a hammer.

flimsy not strong, made of light material. Thin and easily torn. E.g. a flimsy piece of paper/ fabric/ plastic.

defy somebody/something to refuse to obey or show respect for somebody in authority, a law, a rule, etc. E.g. I wouldn't have dared to defy my teachers. Hundreds of people today defied the ban on political gatherings.

hammer-wielding carrying a hammer. 

wield something to hold something, ready to use it as a weapon or tool. E.g. He was wielding a large knife.

commotion: /kəˈməʊʃn/ sudden noisy confusion or excitement. E.g. I heard a commotion and went to see what was happening. The crowd waiting outside was causing a commotion.

(in) broad daylight (in) the clear light of day, when it is easy to see. E.g. The robbery occurred in broad daylight, in a crowded street.

Bystander: a person who sees something that is happening but is not involved. Onlooker. E.g. innocent bystanders at the scene of the accident. 

dash: to go somewhere very quickly. Rush. E.g. I must dash (= leave quickly), I'm late. She dashed off to keep an appointment. He dashed along the platform and jumped on the train.

pin somebody down to make somebody unable to move by holding them firmly. E.g. Two men pinned him down until the police arrived.

freelance: /ˈfriːlɑːns/ earning money by selling your work or services to several different organizations rather than being employed by one particular organization. E.g. a freelance journalist. Freelance work.

Footage: /ˈfʊtɪdʒ/ part of a film showing a particular event. E.g. old film footage of the moon landing. People see live footage of the war at home on their televisions.

turn out: to be discovered to be; to prove to be. E.g. turn out that… It turned out that she was a friend of my sister.

confront somebody /kənˈfrʌnt/ to face somebody so that they cannot avoid seeing and hearing you, especially in an unfriendly or dangerous situation. E.g. This was the first time he had confronted an armed robber. Confronted by an angry crowd, the police retreated.

take sb on: to play against somebody in a game or contest; to fight against somebody. E.g. to take somebody on at tennis. The rebels took on the entire Roman army.

would-be: used to describe somebody who is hoping to become the type of person mentioned. E.g. a would-be actor. Advice for would-be parents.


Ex 4A
KEY

The speakers wouldn’t do what Ann Timson did.

Ex 4B
a have-a-go-hero: someone who gets involved when a crime occurs and tries to stop the criminal(s)
When push comes to shove: when faced with the reality rather than the story.
When there is no other choice; when everything else has failed. When one must commit oneself to an action or decision. E.g. when push came to shove, I always stood up for him.
Shove: /ʃʌv/ to push somebody/something in a rough way. The crowd was pushing and shoving to get a better view.
jumped on the bandwagon: did or supported what everyone else was because it’s fashionable or might bring you personal gain. 
climb/jump on the bandwagon: (informal, disapproving) to join others in doing something that is becoming fashionable because you hope to become popular or successful yourself. E.g. politicians eager to jump on the environmental bandwagon. (Origin: In the US, political parades often included a band on a wagon. Political leaders would join them in the hope of winning popular support.) 
I take my hat off to her: I respect her for what she did
I’d probably leg it: it’s likely that I’d run away. E.g. I’d probably leg it.

leg it: (informal, especially British English) to run, especially in order to escape from somebody. E.g. We saw the police coming and legged it down the road. 
I’d do my bit: I’d do what’s expected of me
do your bit (informal) to do your share of a task. E.g. We can finish this job on time if everyone does their bit.


charge + adverb/preposition: to rush in a particular direction. E.g. The children charged down the stairs. He came charging into my room and demanded to know what was going on.
own up (to something/to doing something) to admit that you are responsible for something bad or wrong. Confess. E.g. I'm still waiting for someone to own up to the breakages. Why don't you just own up and hope she forgives you? I own up to cowardice /ˈkaʊədɪs/.
instantaneous /ˌɪnstənˈteɪniəs/
pile + adverb/preposition (informal) (of a number of people) to go somewhere quickly without order or control. E.g. The coach finally arrived and we all piled on. Children were piling out of the school bus. You pile in and you do what you can.


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