Tuesday, 14 January 2014

Speakout Advanced p 106. Keys and Vocabulary

Ex 9A
Vocabulary
start-up: a company that is just beginning to operate. E.g. Icontech.com is an internet start-up.

relocate: (especially of a company or workers) to move or to move somebody/something to a new place to work or operate. E.g. The firm may be forced to relocate from New York to Stanford.

motto: /ˈmɒtəʊ/ a short sentence or phrase that expresses the aims and beliefs of a person, a group, an institution, etc. and is used as a rule of behaviour. E.g. The school's motto is: ‘Duty, Honour, Country’. ‘Live and let live.’ That's my motto.

stunningextremely attractive or impressive. E.g. a stunning view of the lake

striking: interesting and unusual enough to attract attention. E.g. That hat looks very striking.
 
Ex 10A

a) stand up for (talk in support of). E.g.  Always stand up for your friends. You must stand up for your rights. She had learnt to stand up for herself.



b) came up with (thought of ideas. plans, etc.). E.g. She came up with a new idea for increasing sales.



c) put up with (tolerated) E.g. I don't know how she puts up with him. I'm not going to put up with their smoking any longer.



2 It is not possible to split three-part multi-word verbs. 



3 The stress is on the first particle i.e. up. 

particle: an adverb or a preposition that can combine with a verb to make a phrasal verb. E.g. In ‘She tore up the letter’, the word ‘up’ is a particle.

Ex 10B
KEY
The only piece of advice which is not a good idea is point 2.

Vocabulary
go on: continue

carry out: to do and complete a task. E.g.  to carry out an inquiry/an investigation/a survey. Extensive tests have been carried out on the patient.

set up: to create something or start it. E.g. to set up a business. A fund will be set up for the dead men's families. 

pick upto go somewhere in your car and collect somebody who is waiting for you. E.g. I'll pick you up at five.


go back: to return to a place. E.g. She doesn't want to go back to her husband (= to live with him again). This toaster will have to go back (= be taken back to the shop/store where it was bought)—it's faulty. Of course we want to go back some day—it's our country, our real home.


come back: to return. E.g. You came back (= came home) very late last night. The colour was coming back to her cheeks.

point out: to mention something in order to give somebody information about it or make them notice it. E.g. She tried in vain to point out to him the unfairness of his actions. He pointed out the dangers of driving alone.


find out: to get some information about something/somebody by asking, reading, etc. E.g. She'd been seeing the boy for a while, but didn't want her parents to find out.


come up: to happen. E.g. I'm afraid something urgent has come up. We'll let you know if any vacancies come up.





fall out (with somebody): to have an argument with somebody so that you are no longer friendly with them. E.g. She has fallen out with Sam again.

get over:  
1. get over sth: to deal with or gain control of something. E.g. She can't get over her shyness.
2. get over sth: to return to your usual state of health, happiness, etc. after an illness, a shock, the end of a relationship, etc. E.g. He was disappointed at not getting the job, but he'll get over it.


come up:  
1. to rise. E.g. We watched the sun come up.
2. to happen. E.g. I'm afraid something urgent has come up. We'll let you know if any vacancies come up.
3. to be mentioned or discussed. E.g. The subject came up in conversation.  
4. (of an event or a time) to be going to happen very soon. E.g. Her birthday is coming up soon 


eat up: to eat all of something. E.g. Eat up! We've got to go out soon. Come on. Eat up your potatoes.

 



Ex 11
KEY
1 get away with
get away with: to do something and not get punished for it. E.g. You can't get away with that!



2 get round to
get round/ around to something: to find the time to do something. I meant to do the ironing but I didn't get round to it. Get round/ around to doing something I hope to get around to answering your letter next week.



3 go in for 
go in for: to have something as an interest or a hobby. E.g. She doesn't go in for team sports.



4 go along with 
go along with somebody/ something: to agree with somebody/ something. E.g. I don't go along with her views on private medicine.




5 come down to 
come down to something: to be the most important aspect of a situation or problem. To be able to be explained by a single important point. E.g. In the end, it all comes down to who wants the job the most. What it comes down to is, either I get more money or I leave.



6 come up with
come up with something: [no passive] to find or produce an answer, a sum of money, etc. E.g. She came up with a new idea for increasing sales. How soon can you come up with the money?


7 put up with
put up with somebody/something: to accept somebody/ something that is annoying, unpleasant, etc. without complaining. Tolerate. E.g. I don't know how she puts up with him. I'm not going to put up with their smoking any longer.



8 put down to 
put something down to something: to consider that something is caused by something. Attribute. E.g. What do you put her success down to?



9 stand up to 
stand up to somebody: to resist somebody; to not accept bad treatment from somebody without complaining. E.g. It was brave of her to stand up to those bullies.



10 stand up for 
stand up for somebody/something: to support or defend somebody/ something. E.g. Always stand up for your friends. You must stand up for your rights/ beliefs. She had learnt to stand up for herself.



11 catch up with 
catch up (with): to talk to someone you have not seen for some time and find out what they have been doingE.g.  I'll catch up with you another time, Kevin. It'll give them a chance to talk and catch up with all their news. Come over tomorrow and we can catch up. Let me catch you up on all the gossip.



12 catch on to
catch on (to something): (informal) to understand something. E.g. He is very quick to catch on to things. Then I caught on to what it was the man was saying. He didn't catch on at first.

scam: a clever and dishonest plan for making money. E.g. an insurance scam


Ex 12
Vocabulary
get round to: to find the time to do something. E.g. I meant to do the ironing but I didn't get round to it. Get round/around to doing something I hope to get around to answering your letter next week.


come up with something [no passive] to find or produce an answer, a sum of money, etc. E.g. She came up with a new idea for increasing sales.

put up with somebody/something: to accept somebody/ something that is annoying, unpleasant, etc. without complaining. Tolerate. E.g. I don't know how she puts up with him. I'm not going to put up with their smoking any longer.


catch up (with): to talk to someone you have not seen for some time and find out what they have been doing. E.g. Come over tomorrow and we can catch up.Catch up with I’ll catch up with you another time, Kevin. It’ll give them a chance to talk and catch up with all their news. 

go in for: to have something as an interest or a hobby. E.g. She doesn't go in for team sports.

 
stand up for somebody/something: to support or defend somebody/ something. E.g. Always stand up for your friends. You must stand up for your rights/ beliefs. She had learnt to stand up for herself.


p 156
Ex 1A
KEY
a) (3) cut down on 
cut down (on something): to reduce the amount or number of something. E.g. The doctor told him to cut down on his drinking. I won't have a cigarette, thanks—I'm trying to cut down (= smoke fewer).
TV meal: A prepackaged meal (also called TV dinner, ready-made meal, ready meal, frozen dinner, frozen meal, microwave meal)



b) (7) go through with 
go through with something: to do what is necessary to complete a course of action, especially one that is difficult or unpleasant. E.g. She decided not to go through with (= not to have) the operation.



c) (1) go back on  
go back on something: to fail to keep a promise; to change your mind about something. E.g. He never goes back on his word (= never fails to do what he has said he will do).



d) (8) go down with  
go down with something: (especially British English) to become ill/ sick with something. Catch. E.g. Our youngest boy has gone down with chickenpox (Sp. varicela).



e) (9) do away with  
do away with something (informal) to stop doing or having something; to make something end. E.g. He thinks it's time we did away with the monarchy.



f) (10) look down on  
look down on somebody/something: to think that you are better than somebody/ something. E.g. She looks down on people who haven't been to college.



g) (6) keep up with  
keep up (with somebody/something): to move, make progress or increase at the same rate as somebody/ something. E.g. Slow down—I can't keep up! I can't keep up with all the changes. Wages are not keeping up with inflation.



h) (5) watch out for 
watch out for somebody/something 1 to make an effort to be aware of what is happening, so that you will notice if anything bad or unusual happens. E.g. The cashiers were asked to watch out for forged banknotes. 2 to be careful of something. E.g. Watch out for the stairs—they're steep.



i) (4) look in on  
look in (on somebody): to make a short visit to a place, especially somebody's house when they are ill/ sick or need help. E.g. She looks in on her elderly neighbour every evening. Why don't you look in on me next time you're in town?



j) (2) get up to 
get up to something to do something, especially something that you should not do. E.g. The children get up to all sorts of mischief (Sp. travesura) when I'm not here.

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