Wednesday, 8 January 2014

Speakout Advanced p 100. Keys and Vocabulary

Ex 1B
KEY
art



science 


Ex 2
KEY
The concept of the arrow of time, which describes how time is characterised by irreversible change.


Ex 3
KEY
1. b



2. d



3. a



4. c

Ex 4B
KEY

1. jumbled up
jumble something (together/up) to mix things together in a confused or untidy way. E.g. Books, shoes and clothes were jumbled together on the floor. She put the raffle tickets into a bag and jumbled them up. The letters in these words have been jumbled up.



2. onto glaciers
bounce: if something bounces or you bounce it, it moves quickly away from a surface it has just hit or you make it do this. E.g. bounce something (against/on/off something) She bounced the ball against the wall.

chunk: a thick solid piece that has been cut or broken off something. E.g. a chunk of cheese.

glacier: /ˈɡlæsiə(r)/ a large mass of ice, formed by snow on mountains, that moves very slowly down a valley


3. future
compel: to force somebody to do something; to make something necessary. E.g. The law can compel fathers to make regular payments for their children.



4. change



5. tragedy



6. irreversibly changing 




Transcript
Why are we here? Where do we come from? These are the most enduring of questions.
And it's an essential part of human nature to want to find the answers.
The glacier is such a massive expanse of ice that, at first sight, just like the cycles of the heavens, it appears fixed and unchanging.
Yet, seen close-up, it's continually on the move, as it has been for tens of thousands of years.
As time passes, snow falls, ice forms, the glacier gradually inches down the valley and huge chunks of ice fall into the lake below.
But even this simple sequence contains a profound idea.
Events always happen in the same order.
They're never jumbled up and they never go backwards.

Now that's something that you would never see in reverse.
But, interestingly, there's nothing about the laws of physics that describe how all those water molecules are moving around, that prevent them from all getting together on the surface of the lake, jumping out of the water, sticking together into a block of ice and then gluing themselves back onto the surface of the glacier again.
But, interestingly, we do understand why the world doesn't run in reverse.
There is a reason.
We have a scientific explanation.
And it's called the arrow of time.
We never see waves travelling across lakes, coming together and bouncing chunks of ice back onto glaciers.
We are compelled to travel into the future.
And that's because the arrow of time dictates that as each moment passes, things change.
And once these changes have happened, they are never undone.
Permanent change is a fundamental part of what it means to be human.
And we all age as the years pass by.
People are born, and they live, and they die.
I suppose it's kind of the joy and tragedy of our lives.
But out there in the universe, those grand and epic cycles appear eternal and unchanging.
But that's an illusion.
You see, in the life of the universe, just as in our lives, everything is irreversibly changing.



Vocabulary
expanse (of something) /ɪkˈspæns/ a wide and open area of something, especially land or water. Sp. extensión. E.g. a wide/vast expanse of blue sky. Flat expanses of open farmland.


inch: (V) to move or make something move slowly and carefully in a particular direction. E.g. She inched cautiously towards the edge of the cliff. The cat inched a little closer. 



chunk: a thick solid piece that has been cut or broken off something. E.g. a chunk of cheese.


jumble something (together/up) to mix things together in a confused or untidy way. E.g. Books, shoes and clothes were jumbled together on the floor. She put the raffle tickets into a bag and jumbled them up. The letters in these words have been jumbled up.


glue: fasten or join with or as if with glue. E.g. the wood is cut into pieces which are then glued together. She glued the label onto the box.

grand: impressive and large or important. E.g. It's not a very grand house. The wedding was a very grand occasion. 

epic: very great and impressive a tragedy of epic proportions


Ex 5
Vocabulary
relish: to get great pleasure from something; to want very much to do or have something. Enjoy. E.g. I don't relish the prospect of getting up early tomorrow. Nobody relishes cleaning the oven.
to relish a fight/challenge/debate  
to relish the idea/thought of something
 

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