Wednesday, 6 November 2013

Speakout Advanced p 37. Hotel Chelsea. Extra Word Formation

To say that the Hotel Chelsea has an interesting (INTEREST) history would be a/ an 1_______________ (STATE) . Since the early 2__________ (TWENTY) century, the hotel has been home to dozens of 3____________ (CELEBRATE). The fame of the building itself 4_________ (DATE) its fame as a hotel; when it was constructed in 1883 as a block of flats, it was New York's tallest building. It became a hotel in 1905. Although 5___________ (PROSPER) at first, during a period of 6___________________ (ADMINISTER) the hotel began to degenerate. It went 7_____________ (BANK) and changed hands in 1939. Its 8___________ (ACTIVE) new managers soon got it up and 9___________ (RUN) again and, in the post-war era, its fame grew.
As a part of the New York 10_______ (ART) scene, the hotel is 11____________ (PLACE). Its famous residents have included actors, artists, singers, writers and numerous 12_______________ (ESTABLISH) figures. Frida Kahlo, Jean-Paul Sartre, Jackson Pollock, Marilyn Monroe, Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, Madonna and Uma Thurman all lived there for a while, and the hotel has been 13_____________ (MORTAL) (and some would say 14______________ (EXPOSE)) in dozens of songs, books and films (9 1/2 Weeks, The Interpreter). Always a place of 15___________ (CONFORM), the hotel 's management sometimes allowed 16___________ (PENNY) residents to pay for their rooms with artworks, some of which still hang in its lobby today. Its famous residents have found the hotel 17___________ (CONDUCE) to creativity. Arthur C. Clarke and Jack Kerouac wrote, 18_____________ (RESPECT), 2001 . A Space Odyssey and On
the Road
while living in the hotel, and Madonna used it for a photo shoot for one of her books. 19_________________ (FORTUNE), the hotel is also associated with artistic 20_____________ (BEHAVE) and tragedy. One of numerous examples of wild adventures behind its closed doors, the poet Dylan Thomas collapsed in room 205 of the hotel after partying too hard. He died four days later.

1.  understatement
understatement  /ˈʌndəsteɪtmənt/ a statement that makes something seem less important, impressive, serious, etc. than it really is. E.g. To say we were pleased is an understatement (= we were extremely pleased).‘These figures are a bit disappointing.’ ‘That's got to be the understatement of the year.’ To say I am delighted is an understatement.



2. twentieth 



3. celebrities 



4. predates
predate something to be built or formed, or to happen, at an earlier date than something else in the past. E.g. Few of the town's fine buildings predate the earthquake of 1755. 



5. prosperous /ˈprɒspərəs/ 



6. maladministration /ˌmælədˌmɪnɪˈstreɪʃn/ the fact of managing a business or an organization in a bad or dishonest way. E.g. I found no maladministration in the council’s actions.



7. bankrupt /ˈbæŋkrʌpt/ 



8. proactive /ˌprəʊˈæktɪv/ (of a person or policy) controlling a situation by making things happen rather than waiting for things to happen and then reacting to them. E.g. a proactive approach.  
Managers must be proactive in identifying and preventing potential problems. 



9. running 
up and running: working fully and correctly. E.g. It will be a lot easier when we have the database up and running. The new computer is up and running.



10. artistic



11. irreplaceable 



12. anti-establishment 
anti-establishment: the establishment or established authority. E.g. they are anti-establishment and eccentric, with a wilful disregard for convention
wilful: done deliberately, although the person doing it knows that it is wrong. E.g. wilful damage.



13. immortalised/ immortalized 



14. overexposed
overexpose somebody/something to allow somebody/something to be seen too much on television, in the newspapers, etc. E.g. The club is careful not to let the younger players be overexposed, and rarely allows them to be interviewed. 



15. nonconformity /ˌnɒnkənˈfɔːmɪti/ the fact of not following normal ways of thinking and behaving. E.g. youngsters are rejecting rebellion and nonconformity in favour of becoming ‘model citizens’



16. penniless



17. conducive

conducive to something: /kənˈdjuːsɪv/ making it easy, possible or likely for something to happen. E.g. Chairs in rows are not as conducive to discussion as chairs arranged in a circle. The soft lights and music were conducive to a relaxed atmosphere.
conduce: /kənˈdjuːs/to lead or contribute to a result (usually followed by to  or toward). E.g.  qualities that conduce to success.  Nothing would conduce more to the unity of the nation.



18. respectively



19. Unfortunately



20 misbehaviour

FULL TEXT
To say that the Hotel Chelsea has an interesting history would be an understatement. Since the early twentieth century, the hotel has been home to dozens of celebrities. The fame of the building itself pre-dates its fame as a hotel; when it was constructed in 1883 as a block of flats, it was New York's tallest building. It became a hotel in 1905. Although prosperous at first, during a period of maladministration the hotel began to degenerate. It went bankrupt and changed hands in 1939. Its proactive new managers soon got it up and running again and, in the post-war era, its fame grew.
As a part of the New York artistic scene, the hotel is irreplaceable. Its famous residents have included actors, artists, singers, writers and numerous anti-establishment figures. Frida Kahlo, Jean-Paul Sartre, Jackson Pollock, Marilyn Monroe, Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, Madonna and Uma Thurman all lived there for a while, and the hotel has been immortalised (and some would say overexposed) in dozens of songs, books and films (9 1/2 Weeks, The Interpreter). Always a place of non-conformity, the hotel 's management sometimes allowed penniless residents to pay for their rooms with artworks, some of which still hang in its lobby today. Its famous residents have found the hotel conducive to creativity. Arthur C. Clarke and Jack Kerouac wrote, respectively, 2001 . A Space Odyssey and On
the Road while living in the hotel, and Madonna used it for a photo shoot for one of her books. Unfortunately, the hotel is also associated with artistic misbehaviour and tragedy. One of numerous examples of wild adventures behind its closed doors, the poet Dylan Thomas collapsed in room 205 of the hotel after partying too hard. He died four days later. 

 

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